Canon Medical Systems USA

  • Bundled payment program contracts rise as partners drop out

    Bundled payment program contracts rise as partners drop out

    Henry Powderly - Healthcare Finance | August 14, 2015


    More than 2,100 healthcare providers have passed through the review stage and will begin taking on financial risk in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative, the federal agency announced on Thursday. But while CMS celebrated the news as evidence that its move towards value-based payments is gathering momentum, the reality is more than half of providers that originally signed up have dropped out. CMS on Thursday said 360 organizations have directly entered into bundled payment agreements with the agency, and an additional 1,755 providers have partnered with those organizations as of July. But CMS acting administrator Andy Slavitt in June said there were more than 7,000 providers in the "at-risk" stage of the BPCI model. Read More
  • Alphabet/Google has given birth to a healthcare tech company

    Alphabet/Google has given birth to a healthcare tech company

    Paresh Dave - Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2015


    Over the past couple of years, Google has hired experts in diseases and physiology, pairing them with top software engineers, to tackle major healthcare issues. Projects include developing contact lenses to allow diabetics to constantly monitor glucose levels, defining “healthy” traits and testing disease-detection pills capable of communicating to a special wristband. Read More
  • After Big Data—Keep Healthcare Ahead with Internet of Things

    After Big Data—Keep Healthcare Ahead with Internet of Things

    (Howard) Po-Hao Chen - AJMC | August 17, 2015


    A few years ago I needed hand surgery. Shortly after checking in to the outpatient surgery department, the helpful nurse attached EKG leads onto my arms and chest, and a pulse oximeter to my finger. The monitor next to my bed flickered and came to life. Then, colorful telemetric and oximetric tracings in a nursing station computer reflected an exact copy. A record in the hospital intranet recorded my wellbeing overtime. Wireless connectivity allowed an extra pair of eyes to watched me and to ensure aberrant flickers do not go unnoticed. Read More
  • Congress Takes Aim at Healthcare Technology Data Blocking in a Move That Might Benefit...

    Congress Takes Aim at Healthcare Technology Data Blocking in a Move That Might Benefit...

    Andrea Downing Peck - DarkDaily | August 10, 2015


    Federal health officials are taking steps to end technology vendors’ “data blocking” practices that inhibit the electronic transfer of patient information. This is a tactic that has proven costly for pathology groups and clinical laboratories that want to interface their laboratory information systems with providers’ or hospitals’ electronic healthcare records (EHRs). Read More
  • The High Cost Of Healthcare: America's $15B Program To Pay Hospitals For Medical Resident...

    The High Cost Of Healthcare: America's $15B Program To Pay Hospitals For Medical Resident...

    Amy Nodrum - International Business Times | August 13, 2015


    A few years ago, a 30-year-old pregnant woman came into the emergency room at Stanford University Medical Center in California. She realized she was spotting while out to lunch with her mother, and panicked. She had struggled to become pregnant for five years and it was just 10 weeks into her first term. Dr. Keith Chan remembers being called to her bedside to perform an ultrasound. At that time, 37-year-old Chan was only a medical student at Stanford, but he already knew enough to diagnose and comfort the worried mother-to-be. “I remember telling her, ‘Your baby is fine -- here's the heartbeat. I think things are going to be okay,’” he says. Now, Chan is entering his fifth year of residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. By this point, his daily duties look very similar to those of a practicing radiologist. But the hospital he serves pays him less than a fifth of what it would have to pay a radiologist to perform the same work. Read More