Canon Medical Systems USA

  • Pt. 3C:  The challenge to achieving expert performance: reducing the historic 30% error rate.

    Pt. 3C: The challenge to achieving expert performance: reducing the historic 30% error rate.

    Anthony Mancuso M.D. - Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiology - University of Florida - College of Medicine | November 22, 2017


    When we review the historic error rates for radiology trainees, we begin to understand the challenge to achieving expert performance. Waite, et. al. in an excellent recent review article concerning medical errors in diagnostic image interpretation 1 informs us that, “Garland, in groundbreaking work in 1949, reported the error rate in diagnostic imaging interpretation to be 33.3% in positive studies “2. When the denominator is shifted to include all positive and negative studies that might be seen “in a day’s work”, the error number is diluted to approximately 4%, with no accounting for the effect of false positive exams. Read More
  • Pt. 3B: Competency or Passing the Boards? Every patient wants an expert.

    Pt. 3B: Competency or Passing the Boards? Every patient wants an expert.

    Anthony Mancuso M.D. - Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiology - University of Florida - College of Medicine | November 22, 2017


    In this installment in the series we will review of the current state of post graduate medical education and training, and the related methods of competency evaluation. Read More
  • Pt. 3A:  Teaching to the Test

    Pt. 3A: Teaching to the Test

    Anthony Mancuso M.D. - Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiology - University of Florida - College of Medicine | November 22, 2017


    “Teaching to the Test” is a far less acceptable educational behavior, as a concept in medical education and training, than it is in primary and secondary school and university education. Such tendencies either should marginalized or eliminated at all levels but most especially in medical education, both at graduate and post graduate levels. “Teaching to the test” erodes the curriculum and significantly reduces the validity of the test of mastery; both of these circumstances are serious decrements to the goal of establishing mastery/competency in a profession that requires critical thinking and problem solving as fundamental skills. Read More
  • Pt. 2:

    Pt. 2: "See one, do one, teach one”: Changing our approach to post graduate medical training.

    Anthony Mancuso M.D. - Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiology - University of Florida - College of Medicine | November 17, 2017


    “See one, Do one, Teach one.” Most everyone has heard this expression during some aspect of their medical education. Examined carefully it appears to be somewhat romantically attractive; perhaps as a cavalier or swashbuckling approach usually quoted during procedural training often by someone who, in reality, knows better. Hidden in the concept is a bit of unintentional cynicism that somehow medical training, whether it’s decision-making or procedural, can be approached simply and in the absence of demonstration of true mastery and competency. Most often, the concept is not true to the real training paradigm; however, it does reflect a potential attitude that most of our patients would find unacceptable. Read More
  • Switching EHRs becoming norm in healthcare

    Switching EHRs becoming norm in healthcare

    http://medicaleconomics.modernmedicine.com | October 25, 2017


    ​Love them or hate them, electronic health record (EHR) systems are a part of healthcare today. But that doesn’t mean physicians are always content with the first—or even second or third—system they select for their practice. According to Medical Economics’ 2017 EHR Report, 62% of all respondents have switched EHRs during their career. Read More